A Partnership of ABC and CRF

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

Diversity & Inclusion

Gender and ethnic diversity, inclusion, and equality is paramount for success and advancement in the medical field. The key to initiating change and improving this climate is to be well-informed of the facts surrounding male and female representation in cardiology, minority representation in clinical trials, and similar topics.

Medical Schools Slowly Becoming More Diverse
Medical schools are slowly becoming more diverse according to a research letter published in JAMA which examined the changing demographics of medical students from 2002 to 2017. NPR noted that researchers believe that the increase in diversity enrollment may be attributed to a 2009 guideline requiring that all medical schools implement policies that help attract and retain more diverse students.
Minority Resident Physicians Routinely Face Racism
Reuters reports that a study published in JAMA Network Open found that minority resident physicians routinely deal with bias during their training. Although blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans together make up one-third of the nation’s population, these three minorities make up just 9% of physicians. The authors note that addressing these unique challenges related to race/ethnicity is crucial to creating a diverse and inclusive work environment and minimizing potential damage to the minority pipeline.
Women More Likely to Survive Heart Attacks If Treated by Female Doctors
Women admitted to the hospital with heart attacks are more likely to survive if they are treated by female doctors, reported The Atlantic in a piece that also examines the enduring male bias in coronary heart disease research. The study, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences also found that male doctors were better at treating women with heart attacks when they had more experience treating these patients, and especially when they worked in hospitals with more female doctors.
Disparities Persist for Women Physicians
According to a recent letter in the Annals of Internal Medicine, disparities in compensation and career advancement persist for women physicians in the United States. Data from a survey of the American College of Physicians (ACP) internists found that the median annual salary for men is $50,000 higher than that for women.